Tag Archives: Sculptural paper

Kenney, Moneyhun, and Volta at Stanley Beaman Sears

Super convenient, super interesting art situation last night at Stanley Beaman Sears, an architecture firm in the heart of downtown Atlanta that hosts quarterly exhibits in its super fine space.

Gallery 180 at Stanley Beaman Sears, open during regular business hours.

Gallery 180 at Stanley Beaman Sears, open during regular business hours.

As explained by Burnaway, Steven Williams of Jacksonville’s Florida Mining gallery, who is the spitting image of Stanley Tucci in The Devil Wears Prada, brought three of his artists to Atlanta to give our city “a try.” Last night’s opening gathered the artists, Mr. Williams, and a compelling exhibit for a delicious, uncrowded, and memorable night of viewing.

Marcus Kenney before his work composed of box springs and vintage jewelry.

Marcus Kenney before his work composed of box springs and vintage jewelry.

Marcus Kenney gave an amusing talk about his work, and made himself accessible for chatting with all comers. The entertainment value of his work here is far higher than a Hollywood movie. Mr. Kenney’s resume is notably full, you collectors. He also shows his work at Marcia Wood Gallery.

Hiromi Moneyhun's "Doppelganger."

Hiromi Moneyhun’s “Doppelganger.”

Hiromi Moneyhun’s paper-cut works generated a lot of buzz in the gallery. Many viewers in attendance last night were architects who marveled at the extended concentration and perfectionism that Moneyhun’s work demonstrates. The conversation seemed never quite to reach the imagery that Moneyhun pursues, full of flowing hair and curvilinear garments.

Kedgar Volta’s video works stand on a firm set of ideas that Volta enjoyed discussing. The works on display are understated, stripped of color, and in this gallery, lacking sound. Better for you to visit Volta’s website and watch his work on your home system.

Not sure what we think about gathering all of these artists under the banner of “Southern artists,” though we advocate the South finally admitting the diversity inherent in its artists and art.

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Landscapes, idylls and ideas: three artists at Poem 88

At Poem 88 you get something extra, a lagniappe. It’s not a cheapie thrown in like a thirteenth beignet, though. It’s something fully nourishing, a dish in itself. During the current show, it’s the title theme, “Et in Arcadia ego.” Even in that idyllic village, people die. Poem 88 refers you to the paintings that address this idea, and then draws a connection to the works currently on display. It’s delicious.

The three artists in the show make works that refer to a kind of idyllic village.

Allyson Ross shows sculptural works on paper, and they depict scenes from the Yosemite Valley.

Half Dome, detail, by Allyson Ross, via allyson-ross.com

Half Dome, detail, by Allyson Ross, via allyson-ross.com

Ted Fair shows photographs that seem to be from a spirit of purposeful wandering to find the strange juxtapositions in the American landscape.

Untitled, by Ted Fair

Untitled, by Ted Fair

Sean Abrahams shows drawings that manifest an artist’s imagining of a specific cartoon-like wilderness.

Landscape, by Sean Abrahams

Landscape, by Sean Abrahams

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